IOCAS-IR  > 海洋地质与环境重点实验室
Geochemical records of Taiwan-sourced sediments in the South China Sea linked to Holocene climate changes
Huang, Jie; Wan, Shiming; Xiong, Zhifang; Zhao, Debo; Liu, Xiting; Li, Anchun; Li, Tiegang
2016
Source PublicationPALAEOGEOGRAPHY PALAEOCLIMATOLOGY PALAEOECOLOGY
Volume441Issue:2016Pages:871-881
SubtypeArticle
AbstractWe present a multi-proxy geochemical analysis of core KNG5 retrieved from the northern South China Sea slope spanning the last 13.0 ka BP to assess the response of weathering and erosion processes in the Southwestern Taiwan River basin to climate change. A provenance analysis indicates that the core sediments were primarily derived from the Southwestern Taiwan River, and can be used to reconstruct the erosion and/or weathering history of this river basin. The chemical index of alteration, the plagioclase index of alteration, Rb/Sr, Al/Ti, principle component 1, and K/Al combined with terrigenous mass accumulation rates and the proportion of clay exhibit sharp excursions from 12.0 to 5.5 ka, peaking at 10.0 ka, which suggests strong chemical weathering and physical erosion during the Early-Mid Holocene, the period of the maximum summer monsoon. Abrupt falling weathering trends during 5.2 and 3.5 ka BP correlate with a weaker monsoon. After 3.5 ka BP, a stable lower weathering trend to the present day was evident, indicating the deposition of less weathered sediments in the slope when the monsoon rainfall was weakening. A good correlation between our proxy records of chemical weathering and variations of the monsoon intensity in South China emphasizes that variation in monsoon intensity is most likely the primary drive of the intensity of weathering and erosion in Southwestern Taiwan River sediments over the last 13.0 ka BP. Finally, we concluded that geochemical parameters can be used as reliable proxies for climate variation on a millennial-centennial time scale in such areas as Taiwan, where weathering-limited regimes exist. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
KeywordGeochemistry Chemical Weathering Physical Erosion Taiwan East Asian Monsoon South China Sea
DOI10.1016/j.palaeo.2015.10.036
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000367113900020
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Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.qdio.ac.cn/handle/337002/86641
Collection海洋地质与环境重点实验室
AffiliationChinese Acad Sci, Inst Oceanol, Key Lab Marine Geol & Environm, Qingdao 266071, Peoples R China
First Author AffilicationInstitute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Huang, Jie,Wan, Shiming,Xiong, Zhifang,et al. Geochemical records of Taiwan-sourced sediments in the South China Sea linked to Holocene climate changes[J]. PALAEOGEOGRAPHY PALAEOCLIMATOLOGY PALAEOECOLOGY,2016,441(2016):871-881.
APA Huang, Jie.,Wan, Shiming.,Xiong, Zhifang.,Zhao, Debo.,Liu, Xiting.,...&Li, Tiegang.(2016).Geochemical records of Taiwan-sourced sediments in the South China Sea linked to Holocene climate changes.PALAEOGEOGRAPHY PALAEOCLIMATOLOGY PALAEOECOLOGY,441(2016),871-881.
MLA Huang, Jie,et al."Geochemical records of Taiwan-sourced sediments in the South China Sea linked to Holocene climate changes".PALAEOGEOGRAPHY PALAEOCLIMATOLOGY PALAEOECOLOGY 441.2016(2016):871-881.
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