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The formation of the South China Sea resulted from the closure of the Neo-Tethys : A perspective from regional geology
Sun WeiDong1,2,3,4; Lin ChiouTing1; Zhang LiPeng1; Liao RenQiang1,4; Li CongYing1
2018
Source PublicationACTA PETROLOGICA SINICA
ISSN1000-0569
Volume34Issue:12Pages:3467-3478
Corresponding AuthorSun WeiDong(weidongsun@qdio.ac.cn)
AbstractThis contribution summarizes our new progresses on the formation of the South China Sea (SCS) . Our results indicate that the SCS was formed during the closure of the Neo-Tethys Ocean, rather than extrusion of the Indochina Peninsula induced by the collision between Eurasian and Indian continents as previously proposed. The Neo-Tethys Ocean was located between the Eurasian, African, Indian and Australian continents. It was bell-shaped, opening towards the east. The northward subduction of the Neo-Tethys Ocean may have started as early as the Jurassic in the west. At about 130Ma, the eruption of the Kerguelen large igneous province initiated a new ridge to the south of Indian and, consequently the northward drifting of plates and the old spreading ridge of the Neo-Tethys Ocean. Back-arc extension was more developed in the east because the Neo-Tethys Ocean was wider there. The Proto-SCS was most likely one of the back-arc basins. Ridge subduction was a major event during the closure of the Neo-Tethys Ocean, which resulted east-west ward linearly distributed adakites of 100 similar to 110Ma, from the Philippines, Fujian, Canton till to the Tibetan Plateau. Adakites to the east of Canton are closely associated with porphyry Cu deposits, whereas these in the Tibetan Plateau are mineralized, but no major deposits have been discovered so far. Considering plate reconstruction results, the ridge subduction was responsible to the adakites. Meanwhile, there was a widely distributed northward compression in the South China block, which is consistent with the subduction of the Neo-Tethys ridge. We suspect that such compression was responsible to the onset of the closure of the Proto-SCS. Interestingly, adakitic charnockite formed in the Gangdese belt, while large scale magmatic flare occurred to the north of the Gangdese at similar to 110Ma, in the Tibetan Plateau. We propose that the Neo-Tethys ridge was roughly parallel to the subduction zone and subducted underneath the Eurasian Continents at 100 similar to 110Ma, resulted in compression and adakites. Magmatic flare occurred due to the sinking of the front ( north) limb of the subducted ridge. The south limb of the ridge rolled back later on, forming A-type granites of similar to 80Ma. Most of these A-type granites are A(2) type, which have been influenced by subduction of plate with reducing matters and are associated with tin deposits that account for 60% of the worlds total tin reserves. Slab roll back resulted in extensions, which plausibly explains the "Shenhu" Movement. After the slab rolled back, flat subduction changed to normal subduction, the SCS formed as a result of back-arc extension during the continuous subduction of the Neo-Tethys plate, which eventually formed oceanic crust similar to 33 Ma. The collision at the Tibetan Plateau triggered mantle flows and major changes in the tectonic regime of eastern Asia. Such extension, however, was not the controlling factor for the extension of the SCS. At similar to 23Ma, the subduction of the 90 degrees East Ridge blocked the eastward mantle flow and southeastward extrusion of the Indochina Peninsula. Meanwhile, the subduction of the 90 degrees East Ridge also led to the westward bending of the Indochina Peninsula and consequently the southward ridge jump of the SCS.
KeywordSouth China Sea Tibetan Plateau Ridge subduction Adakite A-type granite Tin deposits Ridge jump Collision
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS Research AreaGeology
WOS SubjectGeology
WOS IDWOS:000456931900001
PublisherSCIENCE PRESS
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.qdio.ac.cn/handle/337002/160835
Collection深海极端环境与生命过程研究中心
Corresponding AuthorSun WeiDong
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Oceanol, Ctr Deep Sea Res, Qingdao 266071, Peoples R China
2.Qingdao Natl Lab Marine Sci & Technol, Lab Marine Mineral Resources, Qingdao 266237, Peoples R China
3.Chinese Acad Sci, CAS Ctr Excellence Tibetan Plateau Earth Sci, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
4.Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China
First Author AffilicationChinese Acad Sci, Inst Oceanol, Ctr Deep Sea Res
Corresponding Author AffilicationChinese Acad Sci, Inst Oceanol, Ctr Deep Sea Res
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Sun WeiDong,Lin ChiouTing,Zhang LiPeng,et al. The formation of the South China Sea resulted from the closure of the Neo-Tethys : A perspective from regional geology[J]. ACTA PETROLOGICA SINICA,2018,34(12):3467-3478.
APA Sun WeiDong,Lin ChiouTing,Zhang LiPeng,Liao RenQiang,&Li CongYing.(2018).The formation of the South China Sea resulted from the closure of the Neo-Tethys : A perspective from regional geology.ACTA PETROLOGICA SINICA,34(12),3467-3478.
MLA Sun WeiDong,et al."The formation of the South China Sea resulted from the closure of the Neo-Tethys : A perspective from regional geology".ACTA PETROLOGICA SINICA 34.12(2018):3467-3478.
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